Roll the List #10, Garion’s Take


Roll the List #10: Top 5 Best Movies Free-For-All, Garion’s Take

Honestly, I really don’t enjoy picking favorites when it comes to media.  So much depends on my mood and it’s not like I’ll ever be stuck on a desert island and have to pick one movie to watch until the end of time.  I picked this list because I felt each movie represented a certain aspect that I like to see in movies.  However, if I were to write the same list next week, I imagine it would be completely different.

5. Idiocracy (2006)

Filled with quotable quotes and gaggable gags, Idiocracy is Mike Judge at his best. Idiocracy is one of those films with a surface level of crude jokes and toilet humor, but a much deeper political commentary. It’s based around a normal man who is sent to the future only to find that the human race has become consistently dumber. Of course, Mike Judge manages to shape the movie so every single political movement feels justified in its position. I think that for this reason, it makes an enjoyable politically centered film for everyone.

 

4. The Princess Bride (1987)

I’m certain that everyone is familiar with The Princess Bride, so real summary is needed. The reason why I included it on my list is not only do I think that it’s a badass movie for many reasons (such as quotes, story and actors) I believe that it demonstrates Hollywood doing a film adaption well. While it took artistic liberties from the source material, it followed the original logic and intentions of the novel. The novel itself was an “abridged” version (just the good parts) of a book that never existed. Likewise, the movie used a similar device in reading “just the good parts” of the book. The end result was two distinct forms of entertainment that shared a similarity in storyline, but were comparable in their respective media. This is truly a case where Hollywood made a move based on a book correctly.

 

3. The Avengers (2012)

Going with the theme that I established with The Princess Bride, The Avengers demonstrates how a movie based on a book (or a comic book) can really work. The Avengers was the culmination of Marvel Studios previous ventures, which all worked their own way. What I enjoy is that it didn’t really feel like a “comic book movie” it felt like a scifi/political thriller. I think that’s what make’s Marvel’s approach to its films so unique and satisfying. Rather than making a movie about Captain America and how he does Captain America things, they wrote a compelling story that merely featured Captain America as a character. I believe that it followed the same logic as modern comic books. It’s more “look at this story” and less “look at this amazing thing this guy can do!” Furthermore, I have to say that this movie is justice for the disappointed 10-year-old who first watched the 1961 “Avengers” movie thinking that it would be about superheroes and got suited Englishmen instead.

 

2. Blazing Saddles (1974)

A Mel Brooks western/comedy classic. It pushes political correctness to its limit. I would argue that it’s one of the funniest movies of all time. It lampoons genres, media, people and politics. Some of the references are starting to feel their years, but the movie remains entertaining regardless. I think this movie should be appreciated simply because it refused to walk on egg shells and would blatantly make racially insensitive jokes for the sake of it. Sadly, I don’t think that this kind of movie would survive today’s box office. There are too many people out there who equate jokes with prescriptions and ruin the hilarity of the movie, but that’s a rant for a different time.

 

1. Kung Fu Hustle (2004)

Kung Fu Hustle is an action/comedy starring and directed by Stephen Chow. Kung Fu Hustle takes place primarily in a small Chinese village in the 1940’s. It has great action and contains many martial arts movie tropes. I couldn’t stop laughing throughout the entire movie. There’s even a great couple of twists that keep the story interesting. Overall, it’s really hard to explain, so just go watch it already.

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